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Edison’s Genius of the Invention Business

Edison was an undeniable genius-
Teaching us a great deal about business success

Thomas Edison accomplished in a suit sitting in a chair

Edison’s Inventive Business- Image Credit: wikipedia.org

Edison’s personal and professional lives are well documented. Thomas Alva Edison (1847-1931) was America’s prolific inventor. He essentially created the concept of inventing. He holds 1,093 patents. Recently, I viewed a fascinating documentary (Edison: American Experience, Tribune Media Services, Inc.) of Edison. This documentary was filled with original audio and video footage of Edison’s life, loves, competitiveness, handicap, genius, success, and failures.

Edison is dubbed “The Wizard of Menlo Park” because he was the first person to create a research laboratory, for the sake of research and invention, which is located in Menlo Park, New Jersey. His business was unique for the time. The business of invention wasn’t invented until Edison took invention from being something someone dabbled with to create or improve and item to a full-time job.

Edison’s Journey to Actively becoming an Inventor

Edison only experienced 3 months of education. He was inquisitive and self taught with the assistance of his mother. Yet, it was his natural curiosity and compulsiveness to win which lead him to create his lab. His childhood is filled with stories – everything from sitting on goose eggs to hatch them to burning down a barn to observe fire. He also started having a significant hearing loss as a teenager. Ironically this helped him excel during his career at the telegraph company. During this time he started drawing and reconfiguring ways to improve the telegraph. This was when he actively embraced the inventor within and decided to eventually make this a career.

Edison: Creating Invention as a Business

When Edison had enough funds he bought a 5,000 square foot building which would be his first labratory. He enrolled 29 ambitious creators to join him. His goal was to create 3 minor inventions and 1 major invention every month. Edison’s aggressive goals validated invention as a business. It also demonstrated the notion of not settling for yesterday’s successes.

Edison’s Secret to Success:

Sure there are many other secrets to his success but these are several which are noteworthy. The other secret was that he was able to take one concept (like the telegraph) and see how many different applications could be created from that set of technologies. From the telegraph, Edison created the phonograph and ultimately improved upon the phone, then video, and filmmaking.

Edison shaped the modern lives we live today! You wouldn’t be able to read this now if Edison didn’t create what he did 100+ years ago!

BRILLIANT BREAKTHROUGHS BIG QUESTION:
Which success secret of Edison’s could you adopt to support your business’s profit and success?

BRILLIANT BREAKTHROUGHS BIG TIP:
Adopting many strategies can make you successful. Select a power strategy which you enjoy and consistently work it.

“I never did a day’s work in my life. It was all fun.”
~ Thomas Alva Edison

Please feel free to comment on which action you can take to immediately improve greater profit and success for YOUR Business. 

    THANKS FOR ALLOWING ME TO HELP YOU IMPROVE YOUR BUSINESS!

If you want to discuss this strategy or something you need assistance with,
please call Maggie (262) 716.7750 for YOUR No-cost Consultation.

Blessings of Success to YOU ~
Maggie Mongan, Brilliant CEO & Founder
Brilliant Breakthroughs, Inc.

Direct Dial: 262-716-7750
LinkedIn: Maggie Mongan

p. s.: Thomas Edison was a phenomenal genius. Take a moment to read more about his journey. There are so many fascinating facts about his successes and failures which will benefit any Business Owner or Leader.

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